ACARD Limited

Old Barracks Visitor Attraction

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Refurbishment, Interpretive Design and Business Plan

February 2013


Glossary of Abbreviations

ACARD

A Cahersiveen Area Development (Company)

ATTA

Adventure Travel and Tourism Association

AV

Audio-Visual

CE

Community Employment

CEO

Chief Executive Officer

CIT

Cork Institute of Technology

DSP

Department of Social Protection

EU

European Union

OSi

Ordnance Survey Ireland

RDP

Rural Development Programme

RIAI

Royal Institute of the Architects of Ireland

RIC

Royal Irish Constabulary

UCC

University College Cork

UK

United Kingdom

 

Maps contained in the document are reproduced courtesy of Ordnance Survey Ireland: Licence Number EN0063313

ã Ordnance Survey Ireland/Government of Ireland

 

Paula Kelleher, B.Arch, M.Sc. Urban Design, HDip. GIS, MRIAI

Bill Thorne, M.Sc. Executive Leadership, Dip MS

 

 

 

This Feasibility and Business Plan has been co-funded under the Rural Development (LEADER) Programme, administered in this area by the South Kerry Development Partnership Limited.

 

 

 


Contents

Glossary of Abbreviations............................................................... 2

Section One: Overview........................................... 5

1.1    Genesis............................................................. 6

1.2    The Old Barracks............................................... 6

1.3    Aims................................................................. 6

1.4    The Importance of Daniel O’Connell.................. 7

1.5    O’Connell’s Legacy........................................... 7

1.6    Location............................................................ 8

Section Two: Refurbishment.................................. 9

2.1    Fabric Condition.............................................. 10

2.1.1    Damp Ingress................................................................... 10

2.1.2    Timber-Framed Windows............................................... 10

2.1.3    Floor Finishes................................................................... 11

2.2    Internal Finishes.............................................. 11

2.3    Services.......................................................... 11

2.3.1    Storm Drainage................................................................ 11

2.3.2    Water Services.................................................................. 11

2.3.3    Electrical Power................................................................ 11

2.3.4    Lighting.............................................................................. 11

2.3.5    Heating............................................................................... 12

2.3.6    Telecoms........................................................................... 12

2.3.7    Recommendations.......................................................... 12

2.4    External Areas................................................. 12

2.4.1    Floodlighting..................................................................... 12

Section Three: Interpretive Design...................... 13

3.1    Interpretive Design: Approach........................... 14

3.1.1    Original Drawings............................................................ 14

3.2    Derrynane House and Glasnevin Trust............. 14

3.2.1    Derrynane House............................................................. 14

3.2.2    Glasnevin........................................................................... 14

3.3    Structural Constraints...................................... 14

3.3.1    Building Condition........................................................... 14

3.4    Interpretive Timeline Scope............................. 15

3.5    Ground Floor Space........................................ 15

3.5.1    Royal Irish Constabulary................................................. 15

3.5.2    The Barracks..................................................................... 17

3.5.3    Enoch Trevor Owen......................................................... 17

3.6    First Floor Space............................................. 18

Daniel O’Connell: The ‘Liberator’, Lawyer, and Politician...... 18

3.6.1    Early Years: 1775-1793.................................................. 18

3.6.2    Lawyer: 1794.................................................................... 18

3.6.3    Pacifist: 1805.................................................................... 18

3.7    Second Floor Space........................................ 18

3.7.1    Parliamentarian: 1828.................................................... 18

3.7.2    Internationalist: 1830....................................................... 19

3.7.3    Agitator: 1832.................................................................... 19

3.7.4    Final Years: 1845-1847................................................... 19

3.8    Layout and Circulation.................................... 20

3.8.1    Interpretive Design: Ground Floor................................. 21

3.8.2    Interpretive Design: First Floor....................................... 25

3.8.3    Interpretive Design: Second Floor................................ 29

3.9    Cost Estimates................................................ 30

3.9.1    Refurbishment Cost Estimates...................................... 30

Section Four: Business Plan................................ 33

4.1    Business Plan: Executive Summary.................. 34

4.2    Business Plan: Introduction.............................. 34

4.2.1    Vision.................................................................................. 34

4.3    Business Plan: Market...................................... 34

4.3.1    Current Visitor Performance.......................................... 34

4.3.2    Current Revenue Generation......................................... 35

4.3.3    Current Market View........................................................ 35

4.3.4    Market Expectation.......................................................... 36

4.3.5    Size and Potential............................................................ 37

4.3.6    Competition....................................................................... 40

4.4    Business Plan: Marketing Strategy.................... 40

4.4.1    Objectives.......................................................................... 40

4.4.2    Product............................................................................... 40

4.4.3    Offerings............................................................................ 41

4.4.4    Price.................................................................................... 41

4.4.5    Promotion.......................................................................... 43

4.4.6    Placement......................................................................... 44

4.4.7    People................................................................................ 45

4.4.8    Pathway............................................................................. 45

4.5    Business Plan: Organisation............................. 46

4.5.1    Management Overview................................................... 46

4.5.2    Staffing Requirement...................................................... 46

4.6    Business Plan: Costings and Finance............... 46

4.6.1    Financial Assumptions.................................................... 46

4.6.2    Consolidated Financial Projections.............................. 47

4.6.3    Source of Resources....................................................... 47

Section Five: Appendices..................................... 49

A1    Terms of Reference.......................................... 50

A1.1    Objectives........................................................................... 50

A1.2    Scope.................................................................................. 50

A1.3    Duties of Consultant......................................................... 50

A2    Interpretive Background................................... 51

A3    Original Information Sheets............................. 52

A4    Supporting Consultation.................................. 56

A4.1    Community Consultation Outcomes............................. 56

A5    Visitor Attraction Performance......................... 57

A6    Civil Ceremonies.............................................. 60

 


Tables

Table 1 – External Cost Estimates................................................... 30

Table 2 – Internal Cost Estimates.................................................... 30

Table 3 – Cost Estimate Breakdowns.............................................. 31

Table 4 – Exhibition Provision......................................................... 31

Table 5 – Old Barracks Visitor Performance................................... 34

Table 6 – Current Entrance Fee Schedule...................................... 35

Table 7 – Average Daily Spend (per Person)................................. 37

Table 8 – Base Revenue Generation Projection 2013+................. 39

Table 9 – Total Revenue Generation Targets 2013-2015.............. 40

Table 10 - Course Type 1a Revenue............................................... 42

Table 11 - Course Type 1b Revenue............................................... 42

Table 12 – Course Type 2 Revenue................................................. 42

Table 13 – Course Type 3 Revenue................................................. 42

Table 14 – Course Type 4 Revenue................................................. 42

Table 15 – Course Type 5 Revenue................................................. 42

Table 16 - New Education Offering Target Revenue...................... 42

Table 17 – Café Target Revenue...................................................... 43

Table 18 – Course Type 1a Activity Costs...................................... 43

Table 19 – Course Type 1b Activity Costs...................................... 43

Table 20 – Course Type 2 Activity Costs........................................ 44

Table 21 – Course Type 3 Activity Costs........................................ 44

Table 22 – Course Type 4 Activity Costs........................................ 44

Table 23 – Course Type 5 Activity Costs........................................ 44

Table 24 – Summary Activity Costs.................................................. 44

Table 25 – Consolidated Financial Projections............................. 47

Table 26 – Sources of Marketing Resources.................................. 47

Table 26 – Workshop Outcomes..................................................... 56

Table 27 – Visitor Attraction Performance....................................... 57

 

Figures

Figure 1 – Old Barracks Logo (1996)................................................ 6

Figure 2 – O’Connell: Former National Currency............................ 7

Figure 3 – O’Connell Memorial Park................................................. 7

Figure 4 – Old Barracks Location Plan (OSi)................................... 8

Figure 5 – External Appearance Prior to Cleaning (2010)............ 10

Figure 6 – Principal Floors - Building Layout................................ 15

Figure 7 – Samana Police Station, Punjab, India........................... 17

Figure 8 – Proposed Layout and Circulation................................. 20

Figure 9 – Relative Performance 2007-2011................................... 35

Figure 10 – Paid Visitor Attraction Trend 2007-2011..................... 37

Figure 11 – Base Visitor Number Projection 2013+........................ 38

Figure 12 – Relative Performance 2011........................................... 40

Figure 13 - Possible Rebranded Logo Elements........................... 41

Figure 14 – Existing Interpretive Theme......................................... 51

Figure 15 – Original Interpretive Content....................................... 51

Figure 16 – Information Sheets (2001)............................................ 52

Figure 17 – Community Consultation.............................................. 56


 

 

 

 

Section One: Overview


This section provides a summary of the terms of reference for the Old Barracks Visitor Attraction Refurbishment - Interpretive Design.

1.1      Genesis

In the mid-1980’s the town of Cahersiveen was facing a very serious threat.  The population was continuing to decline dramatically, and despite very great efforts by the County Development Team and other Agencies, it seemed that the tide of rural decline could not be turned back.  Against this backdrop ACARD Limited, the Cahersiveen Community Development Company was formed with the single objective of unifying the effort of the community of Cahersiveen into a positive force to make things happen in the area.

In 1990, ACARD published its first Five-Year Local Development Plan for the town.  This document referenced all of the consultative material, and looked in detail at the statistical realities that defined the development picture for the area.  One thing was clear - Cahersiveen, despite being on the ‘Ring of Kerry’, was not coming anywhere near optimising the economic potential that its geographical location provided. 

The theory is simple; more economic activity equals more jobs; more jobs equals more families that are able to remain in the area and support more business; more business will lead to more jobs.

ACARD first explored the idea of developing the ruin of the former R.I.C. Barracks in the closing years of the 1980’s.  The Local Development Plan sought to make Cahersiveen town more competitive in the tourist market-place. This could most effectively be achieved by using as many local resources as possible - the idea of developing the remains of the Old Barracks fitted exactly into the picture.

In September 1996 the Old Barracks was open to the public with its complete interpretive design in place.

1.2      The Old Barracks

The imposing building was constructed by the British Government between 1870 and 1875 as a Royal Irish Constabulary Barracks.

In 1866 the British and American Magnetic Telegraph Company successfully laid a telegraph cable across the Atlantic Ocean from Valentia Island to Newfoundland. Thus, telegraphic communication was established between the old and new worlds.  This mighty technological task had taken several attempts and cost a vast sum of money, so it is easy to imagine the consternation of the British government when in the very next year the Finian’s of Cahersiveen undertook their ill-fated rising against the British.  The British, concerned that a future uprising may pose a threat to the security of the transatlantic cable, commissioned the Board of Works to build an imposing police barracks in Cahersiveen.

During the Irish civil war the building was badly damaged by fire and stood as a burned out shell for nearly seventy years.

Figure 1 – Old Barracks Logo (1996)

In 1991 ACARD Limited undertook the massive task of restoring the building and preserving both its story, and the story of Cahersiveen.  The building itself was a ruin when work commenced, but after a long period of painstaking research the original drawings for the structure, signed by the Architect Enoch Trevor Owen in 1876, were discovered.  This gave the key to understanding the highly distinctive 'Schloss' style of Architecture of the building.

1.3      Aims

With the decision of the South Kerry Development Partnership Limited to vacate the office spaces within the Barracks, ACARD Limited has developed a plan to convert the spaces on each of the floors back into a use that is appropriate with the Heritage Centre theme of the building.

The Strategic Development Study 2010-2013 proposed that the Heritage Centre will continue to operate from the spaces that it presently occupies on the ground, first and second floors.  This will assure that the artefacts currently displayed will continue to have an appropriate location, and that the story of Cahersiveen town will not be lost.  It will also ensure that the income generated from the Heritage Centre will be assured into the future.

Following investigation, the Board of ACARD have determined that the Old Barracks will be converted to present a number of local themes, key of which is a celebration of the international dimensions of the life of Daniel O’Connell.  To enable this to be realised, the Board has developed this call for proposals to implement an Interpretive Study to examine and propose a practical development plan for the refurbishment of the internal spaces of the Old Barracks.  This call is made subject to the securing of funding through the Rural Development Programme.

1.4      The Importance of Daniel O’Connell[1]

Daniel O'Connell (6th August 1775 – 15th May 1847), often referred to as The Liberator, was an Irish political leader in the first half of the 19th century.

He campaigned for the right for Catholics to sit in the Westminster Parliament, denied for over 100 years, and repeal of the Act of Union, which combined Great Britain and Ireland.

O'Connell was born at Carhan, just east of Cahersiveen, Co. Kerry to the O’Connell’s of Derrynane, a once-wealthy Roman Catholic family, which had been dispossessed of its lands.

The O'Connell's were one of the ancient families of Ireland. Of Celtic origin, they are descended from the sept of Tuath sen Eran, which is traced back to Conaine II, High King of Ireland, circa 165 AD.

After being ousted from Ballycarbery Castle by the Cromwellian army, the O'Connell's moved to Tarmons near Waterville, then to Derrynane.  Morgan and Catherine, Daniel's parents, settled in Carhan where Daniel was born.

Daniel was fostered out to a family named Moran, near Cahersiveen. Fostering was a common practice of the time to 'toughen-up' youngsters.

Thus, Daniel was initiated into the cruel hard life of the Irish peasant living in a lowly thatched cottage where the family sheltered with the animals.

Figure 2 – O’Connell: Former National Currency

Learning Irish as his first language, he thought of the Moran's as his mother and father. When he returned to his natural parents he was unhappy.  His father asked one day - “Did you have any meat to eat whilst you were with the Morans?”.  “Oh!” said Daniel; “We had meat whenever my father killed one of Morgan O'Connell's sheep”.

Maurice O'Connell of Derrynane, Daniel's uncle, had no children and adopted him as his heir, moving to Derrynane where he was brought-up before being sent to Cork and later Douai, France, to continue his education.

Studying Law in Lincoln’s Inn, London, and in King's Inn in Dublin, he became a champion of the poor, taking on the defence of apparently hopeless cases.  He then entered Parliament in London, where he rose to fame and gained the great victory of the Emancipation Act.

453-O'Connell Bust.JPGFigure 3 – O’Connell Memorial Park

Later, he organised the Repeal Movement to repeal the 1800 Act of Union.  He was unsuccessful, and his last days saw the horror of famine stride amongst his beloved people.

Daniel O'Connell died in Genoa in Italy on 15th May 1847 returning from Rome.  His body was returned to Glasnevin, Dublin, for burial, and his heart was taken to Rome.

 

The Daniel O'Connell Memorial Park overlooks the Carhan River, and Daniel O'Connell's birthplace, just to the east of Cahersiveen town.  This parkland was donated to the people of Cahersiveen in 1997 by John (Kitty) O'Sullivan, and the development was undertaken by ACARD Limited.

The bust of Daniel O'Connell in the Memorial Park (adjacent) was designed and created by Alan Hall, the sculptor, of Valentia Island.

1.5      O’Connell’s Legacy

O'Connell's philosophy and career have inspired leaders all over the world, including Mahatma Gandhi (1869–1948) and Martin Luther King (1929–1968). 

q   He was told by William Makepeace Thackeray (1811–1863) "you have done more for your nation than any man since Washington ever did."

q   William Gladstone (1809–1898) described him as "the greatest popular leader the world has ever seen."

q   Honoré de Balzac (1799–1850) wrote "Napoleon and O'Connell were the only great men the 19th century had ever seen."

q   Jean-Henri Merle d'Aubigné (1794–1872) wrote "the only man like Luther, in the power he wielded was O'Connell."

q   William Grenville (1759–1834) wrote, "history will speak of him as one of the most remarkable men that ever lived."

q   O'Connell met, befriended, and became a great inspiration to Frederick Douglass (1818–1895) a former American slave who became a highly influential leader of the abolitionist movement, social reformer, orator, writer and statesman.

q   The founder of the Irish Labour Party and executed Easter Rising leader James Connolly, devoted a chapter in his 1910 book "Labour in Irish History" entitled "A chapter of horrors: Daniel O’Connell and the working class."

q   Patrick Pearse, Connolly's fellow leader of the Easter Rising, wrote: "The leaders in Ireland have nearly always left the people at the critical moment. (...) O’Connell recoiled before the cannon at Clontarf" though adding "I do not blame these men; you or I might have done the same. It is a terrible responsibility to be cast on a man, that of bidding the cannon speak and the grapeshot pour".

In O’Connell’s lifetime, the aims of his Repeal Association - an independent Kingdom of Ireland governing itself but keeping the British monarch as its Head of State - proved too radical for the British government of the time to accept, and brought upon O’Connell both persecution and suppression.

1.6      Location

The Old Barracks Heritage Centre is strategically located on the Fertha River frontage, overlooking the Town Park, the Fertha River road bridge, and south west of the former GSWR railway bridge.

Figure 4 – Old Barracks Location Plan (OSi)


 

 

 

Section Two: Refurbishment


2.1      Fabric Condition

A visual survey of the Old Barracks Heritage Centre building fabric was undertaken during 2012.  This followed an operation to power-clean the external render of the building in support of the activities of Cahersiveen Tidy Towns and the involvement of the town in the Happy Endings Films/RTÉ ‘Dirty Old Town’ Season 2 Programme (Spring 2012).

The survey confirmed a number of structural problems with the building fabric at that time, including: -

q   Local damp ingress to the south-east and south-west elevations;

q   Failure of the majority of the timber-framed sash windows; and

q   Extensive localised wear to the thermoplastic floor tiles.

Figure 5 – External Appearance Prior to Cleaning (2010)

2.1.1      Damp Ingress

The building, by the nature of its height and location, can be classified as being highly exposed to the prevailing winds blowing up the Valentia/Fertha River.

Visual inspection confirmed that the likely cause of damp ingress through the external walls had been caused by the localised breakdown of the external, high-performance acrylic render.  This multi-part render coat was applied in 1996 during the initial reconstruction of the building, and was conditionally guaranteed by the manufacturers (ICI) for a nominal life of 15 years (expiring 2011).

The ingress appears to be most visible at first floor level on the internal face of the southern (town) wall.  Other, more localised internal damp patches can be attributed to the failed window construction.

It is noted that some temporary patching works have been undertaken on the external render to seal larger cracks that were visible at the time of power-washing, however, this work was only undertaken at lower levels on the building.

The visual inspection revealed little sign of water ingress through the roof, save for the southeastern turret, where water staining is clear on the third-floor roof.  It is understood that the power-cleaning operation revealed some likely weather damage at eaves level; however, the valleys and roof abutments appear to without damage.

Recommendation

Based on the outcomes of the visual survey it is recommended that the external envelope of the building be made weathertight.  Given that the major damp ingress through the acrylic render is limited to the south-west and south-east elevations, it is further recommended that the existing render coat be made good, and that a new impervious synthetic render coat be applied to these elevations only. 

It is proposed that the northwest and northeast elevations be re-rendered as part of a proposed planned maintenance regime at a future date (subject to the availability of co-financing).

It is proposed that a full inspection of the roof eaves and joist ends be undertaken when the two elevations are scaffolded, and the timbers be cut out and replaced, as required upon professional inspection.

Both of these recommended solutions would maintain the historic appearance of the building. 

2.1.2      Timber-Framed Windows

Inspection has revealed that the timber-framed sash windows are generally in poor condition throughout the building.

Examination of the original drawings, together with close site inspection, reveals that the detailing of the frames and jambs might have always been problematic.  It is likely that the design may never have provided a satisfactory water-bar seal around the perimeter of the openings.  The prevailing wind-driven rain will have exacerbated this situation.

Equally, the timber, sliding sash is historically renown for its inherent inability to provide a weathertight seal, again presenting little defence to rain driven in high prevailing wind speeds.

There is evidence that various windows have been replaced, or part-replaced during the recent past, in some cases using hardwood components amongst earlier softwood frames.  However, all are in a poor state of repair.

Recommendation

Based on the outcomes of the visual survey it is recommended that all window frames to the southwest and southeast elevations be replaced, and that selected window frames elsewhere be replaced as required.

New window frames are to be supplied in Georgian style to match the existing.  These will be single glazed.

New window frames are to be set in silicone seals within the (cleaned) existing openings.  A red deal architrave is to be fitted internally to all new windows, and an expanding foam sealant is also to be used.

Sliding-sash parting beads are to be provided with a brush seal.

2.1.3      Floor Finishes

The existing thermoplastic floor tile finish is showing signs of wear in heavily-trafficked areas.  In certain other locations the break-up of the floor tile surface can be attributed to localised screed problems.

Recommendation

Given that the thermoplastic tile is not attractive, and the wearing surface has deteriorated in localised areas, it is recommended that the floor finish be replaced in the refurbished public areas of the building.  Subject to further detailed inspection, it is recommended that the existing thermoplastic tiles be retained in the non-public areas.

2.2      Internal Finishes

The general state of the internal wall paint finishes in the public areas of the building is fair, and locally very poor where mould growth and damp is evident.

The general state of the decoration of timber architraves, skirting, mouldings and frames is fair, and in places poor.  The state of all window frames is noted elsewhere.

Recommendation

It is recommended that timber architraves, skirting, mouldings and frames in the public areas will be locally made good, and repainted to agreed specification, as required.

2.3      Services

2.3.1      Storm Drainage

All external rainwater goods, gutters and gullies appear to be satisfactory, subject to further detailed inspection.

Storm drainage to the external areas appears to be satisfactory.

2.3.2      Water Services

Mains water services to the toilet areas on the ground and second floors appear to be satisfactory.

Hot water is provided by local, instantaneous heaters in the toilet areas.

2.3.3      Electrical Power

The building is serviced throughout by a single-phase electrical power distribution system in surface-mounted conduit, with vertical access shafts at two locations.  The incoming supply, metering and main distribution board is located in the basement of the northwestern tower.

13 amp power sockets are generally dispersed throughout the building as twins mounted at skirting level.

2.3.4      Lighting

General (ambient) lighting is generally provided by ceiling mounted fluorescent tube fittings, and is augmented by accent lighting (spotlights) in the current display spaces.

There are localised problems with the lighting fittings in some spaces on the second floor.

External floodlighting to the building elevations is provided by mercury-halide fittings mounted to the southeast and southwest, with the control time clock located in the power distribution room.

2.3.5      Heating

The building is heated throughout by night storage heaters.

2.3.6      Telecoms

The building is served by direct external telephone lines, with 8mb broadband capability.

2.3.7      Recommendations

Based on the outcomes of the visual survey it is recommended that the vertical services ducts be sealed and fire-stopped at each floor level. 

It is proposed that the accent lighting system will be replaced in all of the public areas with low energy, display fittings.   The fluorescent light system may be maintained to provide working light, and the present switches replaced with key switches. 

2.4      External Areas

The external yard area, and the area to the front of the existing building will require attention during the refurbishment of the building. 

The set of three timber flagpoles, located to the front of the yard area, require replacement.

Existing free-standing signage to the front of the building will require replacement, along with a small number of signs attached to the building.

2.4.1      Floodlighting

The external southeast and southwest elevations of the existing building are lit by three mercury-halide discharge lamps, controlled by a single time clock.  These fittings, together with their associated wiring and time clock will require inspection and, if necessary, replacement.

 


 

 

 

Section Three: Interpretive Design


3.1      Interpretive Design: Approach

This section details the agreed approach taken in developing the Interpretive Design.

3.1.1      Original Drawings

A good quality, original set of the majority of the construction drawings has been located in the National Archive, Bishop Street, Dublin 8.  High quality digital copies of these drawings have been obtained with a view to exhibiting elements of these in the proposed interpretive section dealing with the Architect, Enoch Trevor Owen, and the RIC. 

3.2      Derrynane House and Glasnevin Trust

3.2.1      Derrynane House

On Saturday, 1st November 2012, and on two dates subsequently, exploratory visits were made to Derrynane House.  The first of these was in the context of an event being promoted by Jimmy Deenihan TD, Minister for Arts, Heritage and the Gaeltacht.  The event focussed on the international dimension of the O’Connell story.

Derrynane House (Teach Dhoire Fhionáin) was the home of Daniel O'Connell. It is now an Irish National Monument, and forms part of the 320-acre (1.3 km²) Derrynane National Park.

The facilities at Derrynane House include an exhibition, toilets, disabled toilet, car and coach park, and self-guiding trail.  There is an A/V presentation on the O’Connell story.  The House also has a restaurant and coffee shop open from Easter Weekend to the end of September.   The House is owned and operated by the OPW and is open from the beginning of April to the end of November.

3.2.2      Glasnevin

The visitor attraction at Glasnevin Cemetery was visited on Friday, 7th September 2012.

Glasnevin Trust's mission statement is to ‘Preserve the Past for Future Generations’, and was established almost 200 years ago by Daniel O'Connell, to provide a burial place for people of all religions and no religion, Glasnevin Cemetery has grown in historical significance to become Ireland’s Necropolis.

Glasnevin Museum, operated by Glasnevin Trust, opened in April 2010.  The self-funded €11 million museum showcases the social, historical, political and artistic development of modern Ireland through the lives of the 1.5 million people buried in Glasnevin Cemetery – Ireland’s national necropolis. 

The Museum exhibits, designed by Martello Media, are modern and interactive, showing the social, historical, political and artistic development of modern Ireland through the lives of the generations buried in Glasnevin Cemetery.

Glasnevin Cemetery offers a Cemetery Tour up to 4 tours daily (Summer only) open to the general public.

The tone of the meeting with John Green (Chairperson, Glasnevin Trust), George McCullough (CEO Glasnevin Trust), and Shane MacThomais (Historian), was particularly positive, with offers of assistance being made to the O’Connell dimension of the Old Barracks redevelopment.

3.3      Structural Constraints

The Old Barracks building contains approximately 450m2 of floor space that can be readily used in the interpretive design.  A lift serves the three floors that contain this space.  Various other spaces exist in the building, including the two turrets, a part-basement, and a part fourth floor.

Two internal staircases, in addition to the lift, serve the building.

A measured survey of the building has been undertaken to facilitate the renovation works.  The survey has been limited to the building, and does not extend to the yard and grounds.

3.3.1      Building Condition

It is noted that following the cleaning of the external elevations in the first quarter of 2012, the appearance of the building has been very significantly improved.

There are signs of widespread water ingress into the building through the external walls and windows.  Damage is particularly visible on the first floor, southern room of the building.

A full record of the visual inspection is carried in Section 2 of this report.

 


Figure 6 – Principal Floors - Building Layout

3.4      Interpretive Timeline Scope

The Old Barracks interpretive material will cover the following historical period: -

q  1775          Daniel O’Connell was born on 6th August 1775 to

q  1922          The RIC was disbanded on 31st August 1922

It is proposed that the interpretive experience will largely follow the chronological sequence.

It will major on the story of Daniel O’Connell, and will also reference the Great Famine (1845-1852).

The vertical arrangement of the building suggests that the three main public floors will carry interpretive material relating to specific periods.

For circulation reasons, the ground floor will contain references to the design and construction of the Barracks (including Architect Enoch Trevor Owen), to the Great Famine, and to the RIC in Cahersiveen.  This will be out of chronological sequence.

3.5      Ground Floor Space

3.5.1      Royal Irish Constabulary

1822-1922

The Royal Irish Constabulary[2] and was Ireland's armed country-wide police force between 1822 and 1922 and 85,028 men passed through its ranks. Dublin had its own unarmed Dublin Metropolitan Police from 1836 to 1925.

The RIC was instrumental in organising practically all the police forces in the British Colonies.

The RIC was disbanded on 31st August 1922 and replaced in the Irish Free State by the Garda Síochána (formed on 21st February 1922), and replaced in Northern Ireland by the Royal Ulster Constabulary (formed on 1st June 1922).

 

The first organised police forces in Ireland came about through the Peace Preservation Act in 1814 for which Sir Robert Peel (1788–1850) was largely responsible (the colloquial name "Peeler" derives from his surname), and the Irish Constabulary Act in 1822 formed the provincial constabularies. The 1822 Act established a force in each province with chief constables and inspectors general under the control of the UK civil administration for Ireland at Dublin Castle.  By 1841 this force numbered over 8,600 men. The original force had been reorganised under The Act of 1836, and the first constabulary code of regulations was published in 1837. The discipline was tough and the pay was poor. 

The police faced continual civil unrest among the Irish rural poor, and was involved in many bloody confrontations during the period of the Tithe War. Other deployments were against organisations like the Ribbonmen, which attacked landlords and their property and stock.

The new constabulary first demonstrated its efficiency against civil agitation and Irish separatism during Daniel O'Connell's 1843 “monster meetings” to urge repeal of the Act of Parliamentary Union, and the Young Ireland campaign led by William Smith O'Brien in 1848, although it failed to contain violence at the so-called "Battle of Dolly's Brae" in 1849 (which provoked a Party Processions Act to regulate sectarian demonstrations). This was followed by a period of relative calm.

The advent of the Irish Republican Brotherhood, founded in 1858, brought a plan for an armed uprising. Direct action began with the Fenian Rising of 1867.

Fenians attacked on the more isolated police barracks and smaller stations. This rebellion was put down with ruthless efficiency.  The police had infiltrated the Fenians with local informers. The loyalty of the Irish Constabulary during the outbreak was rewarded by Queen Victoria who granted the force the prefix 'Royal' in 1867 and the right to use the insignia of the Most Illustrious Order of St Patrick in their motif.

The RIC presided over a marked decline in general crime around the country.  The unstable rural unrest of the early nineteenth century characterised by secret organisations and unlawful armed assembly was effectively controlled. Policing generally became a routine of controlling misdemeanours such as moonshine distilling, public drunkenness, minor theft, and wilful property crimes.

A Land War broke out in the 1879-82 Depression period causing some general unrest.

From the 1850s the RIC performed a range of civil and local government duties together with their policing, integrating the constables with their local communities. By 1901 there were around 1,600 barracks and some 11,000 constables.

The majority of constables in rural areas were drawn from the same social class, religion and general background as their neighbours.  Strict measures were taken, however, to maintain an arms length relationship between police and public.  A recruit was not permitted to serve in his home county or in the home county of his wife.

The task of enforcement of tens of thousands of eviction orders in rural Ireland caused the RIC widespread distrust among the poor Catholic population during the mid-nineteenth century.  In the relative calm of the late Victorian and Edwardian periods, the RIC won "grudging respect" from the population it policed. 

The military ethos of the RIC, with its army terminology (the barracks, the carbines, and the emphasis on army style drill and smartness in dress) distinguished the force from civic police forces in the rest of the UK.

The RIC wore a distinctive dark green uniform with black buttons and insignia, derived in style from the Rifle Brigade of the British Armed Forces.

The rank structure was paramilitary in nature, similar to that of the British Army of the period: -

1.    Inspector-General (insignia of a Lieutenant-General)

2.    Deputy Inspector General (insignia of a Major-General)

3.    Assistant Inspector General (insignia of a Brigadier-General)

4.    Commissioner (insignia of a Colonel)

5.    County Inspector (insignia of a Lieutenant-Colonel)

6.    District Inspector 1st Class (insignia of a Major)

7.    District Inspector 2nd Class (insignia of a Captain)

8.    District Inspector 3rd Class (insignia of a Lieutenant)

9.    Head Constable Major (insignia of a Warrant Officer)

10.  Head Constable (insignia of a Warrant Officer)

11.  Sergeant

12.  Acting Sergeant (insignia of a Corporal)

13.  Constable

During the 1907 Belfast Dock strike which was called by trade union leader Jim Larkin, the RIC mutinied after Constable William Barrett was suspended for his refusal to escort a traction engine driven by a blackleg carter.  About 70% of the police force in Belfast declared their support of the strikers and were encouraged by Larkin to carry out their own strike for higher wages and a better pension.  It never came to fruition, however, as the dissident policemen were transferred out of Belfast four days before the strike was to begin.  Barrett and six other constables were dismissed and extra British Army troops were deployed to Belfast.  The dock strike ended on 28th August 1907.

The RIC's existence was however increasingly troubled by the rise of the Home Rule campaign in the early twentieth century period prior to World War I. 

Sir Neville Chamberlain was appointed Inspector-General in 1900.

His years in the RIC coincided with the rise of a number of political, cultural and sporting organisations with the common aim of asserting Ireland's separateness from England. The potential success of the third Home Rule Bill in 1912 introduced serious tensions: opponents of the Bill organised the Ulster Volunteer Force in January 1913 while supporters formed the Irish Volunteers in response. These two groups had over 250,000 members, organised as effective private armies.

In reports to the Chief Secretary for Ireland, Augustine Birrell, and the Under-Secretary, Sir Matthew Nathan, Chamberlain warned that the Irish Volunteers were preparing to stage an insurrection and proclaim Irish independence.  However, in April 1916 when Nathan showed him a letter from the army commander in the south of Ireland telling of an expected landing of arms on the southwest coast and a rising planned for Easter, they were both 'doubtful whether there was any foundation for the rumour'.

The Easter Rising began on Easter Monday, 24th April 1916 and lasted for six days, ending only when much of O'Connell Street had been destroyed by artillery fire.  Although the Royal Commission on the 1916 Rebellion cleared the RIC of any blame for the Rising, Chamberlain had already resigned his post, along with Birrell and Nathan.


3.5.2      The Barracks

1870-1875

The building in Cahersiveen was constructed by the British Government between 1870 and 1875 as the Royal Irish Constabulary Barracks.

In 1866 the British and American Magnetic Telegraph Company successfully laid a telegraph cable across the Atlantic Ocean from Valentia Island to Newfoundland.  Thus, telegraphic communication was established between the old and new worlds.

This mighty technological task had taken several attempts and cost a vast sum of money, so it is easy to imagine the consternation of the British government when in the very next year the Fenians of Cahersiveen undertook their ill-fated rising against the British.

The British, concerned that a future uprising may pose a threat to the security of the transatlantic cable, commissioned the Board of Works to build an imposing police barracks in Cahersiveen.

Figure 7 – Samana Police Station, Punjab, India

The story goes that in the haste to protect the interests in transatlantic communication the British mixed-up two sets of plans, and that the building that you are in should actually have been built on the north-west frontier of India whilst a typical Irish police station is to be found nestling in Samana, north India.

 

During the Irish civil war the building was badly damaged by fire and stood as a burned out shell for nearly seventy years.

In 1991 ACARD Limited, the local voluntary community development company undertook the massive task of restoring the building and preserving both its story, and the story of Cahersiveen.

The Old Barracks Heritage Centre was officially opened in September 1996.

3.5.3      Enoch Trevor Owen[3]

c1833-1881

Assistant architect to the Board of Works, Dublin, Enoch Trevor Owen was born circa 1833.

He appears to have been the Enoch Trevor Owen, son of Richard and Mary Owen, who was christened at Wem, Shropshire, in 1835, though the records of Mount Jerome cemetery and the English census of 1851 indicate a birth date of 1832 or 1833. 

By the time of the English census of 1841 (in which Enoch's age is given as eleven) the Owen family had moved to Liverpool, where Richard was in business as a tailor and Mary as an upholstress.  In the 1851 census Enoch, his age now given as eighteen, is described as an architectural student. Enoch was in private practice as an architect in England during the second half of the 1850s; references to him in The Builder between 1856 and 1858 locate his practice in Liverpool and also - probably incorrectly - in Birmingham.

On 10th January 1860 Enoch Trevor Owen joined the architectural staff of the Irish Board of Works, where James Higgins Owen had succeeded Jacob Owen as chief architect and Frederick Villiers Clarendon, a son-in-law of Jacob Owen, was Surveyor of Buildings. Whether he was in any way related to Jacob Owen's family is not clear. 

He may possibly have changed his first name soon after his arrival in Ireland, for it is given as 'Enoch' in the Board's records but as Edward in the minutes of the RIAI, and elsewhere by 1863.

Originally appointed as a drawing clerk, he was promoted to the post of assistant architect and chief draughtsman in February 1863.  After his promotion he seems to have been given the responsibility for the design side of the Board's activities, while James Higgins Owen devoted himself to administration.  His drawing assistants included John C. Campbell, Robert A. Gibbons, Charles Lanauze, Robert John Stirling, and William David Williams.  In 1873, in addition to design work, he carried out a survey of two major national monuments, Glendalough and the Rock of Cashel; these surveys anticipated the creation in 1875 of the part-time post of Inspector of Ecclesiastical National Monuments, which Thomas Newenham Deane was the first to occupy.

Owen died of inflammation of the lungs on 9th April 1881 at the age of forty-eight and was buried at Mount Jerome Cemetery.  After his death there was a re-organisation of the Board's architect's department.  An able draughtsman, he contributed illustrations to Charles Wickes's The Spires and towers of the mediaeval churches of England (1858-59) and exhibited sketches as well as architectural designs at the RHA and at the RIAI's first architectural exhibition in 1865.

Before his responsibilities for the Board increased, he seems, like his son, Alfred Richard Owen, to have been prepared to make drawings for other architects; in 1861 he supplied the perspective views of William George Murray's competition design for the College of Physicians in Dublin.

Addresses: Home: Walnut Street, Liverpool, 1841; 28 Myrtle Street, Liverpool, 1851; 4 Charlemont Parade, Sandymount, Dublin, 1862-1865; 2 Appian Way, 1866-1871; 10 Appian Way (Leeson Cottages), 1872-1881.

In the case of Owen's works for the Board of Public Works, it is not always clear whether Owen himself was directly responsible for a design or simply gave his approval to it.       

3.6      First Floor Space

              Daniel O’Connell: The ‘Liberator’, Lawyer, and Politician[4]

1775-1847

1775 contemporary: Glanleam House[5], Valentia Island, was built as a linen mill in 1775 and later converted into a house by the Knight of Kerry[6], who planted the sub-tropical gardens.

3.6.1      Early Years: 1775-1793

Daniel O’Connell was born on 6th August 1775, in Carhan, near Cahersiveen, Co. Kerry.

The O’Connell’s were a wealthy landed family.

O’Connell spent much of his early life with his uncle, Maurice, at Derrynane House near Waterville, Co. Kerry.

He was educated at a small boarding school near Cork and later he attended Saint-Omer (1791–2) and Douai (1792–3), two of the best Catholic schools in France. There he witnessed the turmoil of the French Revolution, which left him with a lifelong abhorrence of violence for political ends.

3.6.2      Lawyer: 1794

In 1794 O’Connell enrolled in Lincoln’s Inn, London, and two years later transferred to the King’s Inns, Dublin, to study law. While in London, O’Connell read the writings of the philosophers Voltaire and Rousseau, and the works of Godwin, Smith, and Bentham. These moulded his political and economic thinking, and made him a life-long democrat and radical.

O’Connell was called to the Irish Bar in 1798.  He got a reputation for his radical political views. He supported the liberal policies of the United Irishmen but the 1798 rebellion and the ensuing slaughter filled him with revulsion. His first political act was his public opposition to the Act of Union.

3.6.3      Pacifist: 1805

From 1805 he championed the movement for Catholic Emancipation, which aimed at repealing the laws that limited the voting rights and educational opportunities of Catholics. He strongly opposed the proposed Government Veto on the appointment of Catholic bishops.

In 1811 he was elected chairman of Catholic Committee. He mocked the ‘beggarly Corporation’ of Dublin and was challenged to a duel in 1815 by a member, John Norcot d’Esterre.  O’Connell fatally wounded d’Esterre but was extremely remorseful.  His wife refused O’Connell’s offer of a pension, but he later arranged for an annuity for her daughter.

He set up many organisations to raise money for the cause of Emancipation, including the Catholic Association in 1823. This Association also campaigned for the repeal of the Act of Union, the end of the Irish tithe system, universal suffrage, and a secret ballot for parliamentary elections. He wholly rejected the use of violence in the pursuit of political objectives.

3.7      Second Floor Space

3.7.1      Parliamentarian: 1828

In 1828, he was elected to represent Co. Clare.  There was wild popular excitement.  However, because he was Catholic, he was not allowed take his seat.

The British Government, fearing a civil war or at least serious disorder in Ireland because of intense opposition to the existing anti-Catholic legislation, passed the Roman Catholic Relief Act (1829), which granted Catholic Emancipation.  This enabled O’Connell to be elected as representative for Kerry in 1830. The Government, however, outlawed the Catholic Association and greatly reduced the electorate. It eliminated the forty-shilling freehold suffrage in Ireland by raising the suffrage to £10.

As ‘Liberator’ O’Connell was now Ireland’s peerless political leader. He became a major figure in the House of Commons.  He gave up his lucrative law practice to devote all his time to politics.

On a wide range of issues he was a reformer and defender of liberty. He was active in the campaigns for parliamentary, legal, and prison reform, electoral reform and the secret ballot, free trade, the abolition of slavery and Jewish emancipation. Towards the end of 1829 he declared to Isaac Goldsmid, the leader of the Jews in England:

‘You will find in me the constant and active friend to every measure which tends to give the Jews an equality of civil rights with all other the king’s subjects, a perfect unconditional equality’.

Speaking in the House of Commons in 1830, he said that:

‘by conceding the claims of the Jews, we should prove ourselves still more Christian by doing as we would be done by, and carrying into effect the principle of perfect freedom of conscience’.

3.7.2      Internationalist: 1830

He was a passionate opponent of racism and slavery. For him, slavery made the American Declaration of Independence a lie before God and he would never visit the United States because it was a slave-holding country. However, his overarching political objective was the Repeal of the Act of Union and the restoration of the Irish Parliament.

3.7.3      Agitator: 1832

O’Connell and 39 of the Irish MPs returned in the general election of 1832 formed a pressure group in the House of Commons and O’Connell was able to make demands on the Government.

In 1835 he and his fellow Catholic MPs agreed to support Lord Melbourne and his Whig Government in return for significant Irish reforms. Although the Whigs passed a Tithe Commutation Act (1838) and the Irish Municipal Reform Act (1840), O’Connell thought this inadequate.  He was also totally opposed to the passing of the Irish Poor Law Act and when the Whigs refused to change it, he withdrew his support for the Government.

In 1841 O’Connell represented Dublin City in parliament and also became the first Catholic Lord Mayor of Dublin since the seventeenth century.

The National Association of Ireland, commonly called the Repeal Association, was launched on 15th April 1840.  O’Connell’s chief lieutenant was his favourite son, John O’Connell (1810–58). The Association included many Young Irelanders who, unlike him, believed that independence could be won only by use of force. Publicity was gained in papers like the Nation and the Pilot.

O’Connell announced that 1843 would be the Year of Repeal and he began organising what the London Times called ‘monster meetings’ throughout the country.  The first was at of Trim, Co. Meath, which attracted a crowd of over 100,000.  It was estimated that three-quarters of a million, assembled on the Hill of Tara to hear the ‘Liberator’ speak.

Although O’Connell ensured that the huge crowds were orderly and peaceful, the government grew worried that trouble might break out.  Sir Robert Peel, the British Prime Minister, decided to go on the offensive.  He outlawed the subsequent proposed monster meeting, which was to be held at Clontarf on 8th October 1843.  Although O’Connell called off the rally, he was arrested and charged with conspiracy, and sentenced to a year’s imprisonment and a fine of £2,000.  He was also ordered to give securities of £5,000 for seven years’ good behaviour.

Before entering Richmond prison on 30th May 1844, O’Connell went to the House of Commons and made a brief speech to uproarious cheers from the opposition. His conditions in prison were comfortable: he occupied a suite of rooms in the governor’s house and his visitors could come and go as they pleased.

Three months later, on appeal, the House of Lords reversed the decision, and O’Connell left prison a hero in the fight for freedom of speech.  His health had deteriorated while in prison and he was suffering from cardio-vascular disease.  On his release O’Connell continued his Repeal activities although a clear turning point had been reached.

3.7.4      Final Years: 1845-1847

In 1845 he was unable to persuade Parliament to take more decisive steps in dealing with the Irish Famine.  He provided what assistance he could on his own estate. In his last speech in the House of Commons on 8th February 1847, he predicted that unless more aid was forthcoming from the British Government for Ireland ‘one quarter of her population will perish’.

O’Connell came under attack from leading members of the Young Ireland movement who thought his tactics ineffective.  Weakened physically by overwork, disappointed by the failure of Repeal, worried over the disagreements with the Young Irelanders, and suffering increasingly from ill-health, O’Connell decided to go on a pilgrimage to Rome.  When he reached Paris he was greeted by a large crowd of radicals who regarded him as the ‘most successful champion of liberty and democracy in Europe’.  He did not complete his journey to Rome; he died in Genoa on 15th May 1847.

As he had requested, O’Connell’s heart was buried in the Irish College in Rome (in a monument arranged by Charles Bianconi).

His body was interred in Glasnevin cemetery on 5th August 1847.

Sackville Street, Dublin’s main thoroughfare, was renamed O’Connell Street, and at the southern end near the Liffey the great statue of the Liberator by J. H. Foley was erected.


3.8      Layout and Circulation

The physical layout of the Old Barracks creates a number of distinct challenges when considering the use of the space as a Heritage Centre.  The greatest of these challenges results from the need to cater for a vertical travel flow around the building, added to the relatively confined spaces available on each of the floors.

Figure 8 – Proposed Layout and Circulation

 

It is intended that the building will be accessed from the rear (to the yard).  This will be facilitated through the provision of a new entrance door and screen, and the existing front door will no longer be used for public entry or exit.

It is proposed that a new ticket sales and entry space will be created by constructing a new internal doorway.  This new point of departure will enable the upward circulation flow to be confined to the southwestern staircase, as shown on the drawing opposite.

The subsequent circulation flow through the remainder of the floors is dictated by the location of the new entry space.  It is noted that it is not possible to completely eliminate the possibility of visitor’s doubling-back on themselves as they ascend the interpretive spaces, although it is intended to reinforce the correct flow using a strong and logical ‘timeline’ in the proposed layout of the information.

It is not proposed to use the basement as a public area for two reasons: firstly, the floor-to-ceiling heights are restricted, and secondly the space will be required for administration and storage.

It is proposed to use the four main spaces in the northeast wing for flexible exhibition use.


3.8.1      Interpretive Design: Ground Floor


Interpretive Design: Ground Floor Continued

 

 


Interpretive Design: Ground Floor Continued


Interpretive Design: Ground Floor Continued

 

                                                                   


3.8.2      Interpretive Design: First Floor


Interpretive Design: First Floor Continued


Interpretive Design: First Floor Continued


Interpretive Design: First Floor Continued


3.8.3      Interpretive Design: Second Floor


3.9      Cost Estimates

The following cost estimates relate to both the refurbishment of the external envelope of the building (as detailed in Section 2 of this report), and to the major cost elements of the interpretive design.

3.9.1      Refurbishment Cost Estimates

Table 1 – External Cost Estimates

Render - Southwest & Southeast Façade

Description

Measure

Unit

Unit Price

Sub Total

Total

Cavity Wall Insulation

Glenbeigh

Power wash building, treat cracks with mesh and basecoat, double primer application, renovation acrylic render application

 500.00

Sq m

 €35.00

 

 €17,500.00

Windows - Southwest Façade

Holbein Carpentry/Joinery

Kenmare

a) Windows to be retained - remove silicone and reseal, replace parting bead with brush seal bead

8

window

 €200.00

 €1,600.00

 

b) Windows to be replaced - supply and fit;

 

 

 

 

 

1. Fixed light windows

 

window

 €680.00

 

 

2. Bottom opening

 

window

 €790.00

 

 

3. Bottom & top opening

 10

window

 €850.00

 €8,500.00

 

c) Fit Windows - remove old & fit new windows, new silicone around window & expanding foam, red deal architrave inside with primer finish

 10

window

 €150.00

 €1,500.00

 €11,600.00

Scaffolding - Southwest and Southeast Façade

Kevin Moynihan Killarney

Supply, erect, inspect & dismantle scaffolding, each lift to be boarded & hand railed, front façade to be debris netted if required, scaffolding design for over front porch

(requirement of HAS)

 

 

 

 

€12,000.00

 


Table 2 – Internal Cost Estimates

Description

Measure

Unit

Unit Price

Sub Total

Total

Flooring

Experto Flooring Ltd

Wilton, Cork

a) Preparation work- lift, remove and dispose of existing floor finishes and apply a 3mm thick coat of smoothening compound

450

Sq m

 €11.90

 €5,355.00

 

 

b) Flooring - supply and fit;

 

 

 

 

 

 

1. Forbo Real / Fresco

 

Sq m

 €29.60

 

 

 

2. Gerflor Marmorette

 450.00

Sq m

 €27.90

 €12,555.00

 €17,910.00

Demolitions & Alterations

As per attached breakdown

 

 

 

 

 

 €8,020.00

Joinery, Sanitary Ware & Fit-Out

As per attached breakdown

 

 

 

 

 

€22,600.00

Painting & Decorating

As per attached breakdown

 

 

 

 

 

 €22,200.00

Lighting

 

 

 

 

 

 €12,000.00

Mechanical

 

 

 

 

 

 €8,000.00

Exhibits

 

 

 

 

 

 €30,000.00

Bespoke Furniture

 

 

 

 

 

 €21,000.00

Contingency - 5% approx

 

 

 

 

 €12,000.00

 

 

 

 

 

 

 €194,830.00

 


Table 3 – Cost Estimate Breakdowns

Demolitions & Alterations

Description

Measure

Unit

Unit Price

Sub Total

Total

 

Remove skirting & architrave throughout

 

 

 

 €1,000.00

 

 

New double door ope ground floor

 

 

 

€3,000.00

 

 

New block work wall to old reception (plastered b.s. - 215mm thick)

13

m2

 €90.00

 €1,170.00

 

 

Remove stud wall to 1st & 2nd floor & replace with block (to stairs lobby)

30

m2

 €95.00

 €2,850.00

 €8,020.00

Joinery, Sanitary Ware & Fit-Out

 

New fire rated doors (base 3, GF 6, FF 3, SF 3, TF 1)

16

no.

 €650.00

 €10,400.00

 

 

Timber sliding door to new entrance glass door

1

no.

 €1,200.00

 €2,000.00

 

 

New glass door to entrance & glass fire rated lobby to reception

item

 

 €5,000.00

 €5,000.00

 

 

M Dock Pack to disabled toilets

1

no.

 €1,200.00

 €1,200.00

 

 

New sanitary ware to toilets  (not incl. new pipework etc)

item

 

 €4,000.00

 €4,000.00

 €22,600.00

Painting & Decorating

 

Walls

1835

m2

 €8.00

 €14,680.00

 

 

Ceilings

690

m2

 €8.00

 €5,520.00

 

 

New Woodworks (Provisional)

 

 

 

 €2,000.00

 €22,200.00

Lighting

 

Provisional Sum for general lighting

Prov Sum

 

 

 €5,000.00

 

 

Provisional Sum for feature lighting

Prov Sum

 

 

 €7,000.00

 €12,000.00

Mechanical

Provisional Sum for General Mechanical work

Prov Sum

 

 

 

 €8,000.00

 


Table 4 – Exhibition Provision

Exhibits

Description

Measure

Unit

Unit Price

Sub Total

Total

 

Technological & computer based exhibits

Prov Sum

 

 

 €10,000.00

 

 

Audio Visual exhibits

Prov Sum

 

 

 €10,000.00

 

 

Exhibition Panels in painted mdf with vinyl printing

Prov Sum

 

 

 €10,000.00

 €30,000.00

Bespoke Furniture

 

Bespoke cabinets for exhibits

Prov Sum

 

 

 €8,000.00

 

 

Bespoke seating

Prov Sum

 

 

 €5,000.00

 

 

Reception desk

Prov Sum

 

 

 €8,000.00

 €21,000.00

 

 


 

 

 

Section Four: Business Plan


4.1      Business Plan: Executive Summary

The following section details the objectives of the Old Barracks Heritage Centre business, and offers evidence-based projections of the anticipated performance of the redeveloped facility.

It is accepted that definitive information relating to the performance of the tourism industry in Co. Kerry is difficult to obtain.

4.2      Business Plan: Introduction

The primary objective of the completed refurbishment of the Old Barracks will be to add to the visitor attraction of Cahersiveen by providing an iconic facility to house and publically display the international dimensions of the life of Daniel O’Connell.   In so-doing, it will complement the thematic visitor attractions to be found in Glasnevin Cemetery and in Derrynane House.

The redevelopment of the Old Barracks Heritage Centre references ACARD’s proven ability to preserve and develop buildings and environments of historic and amenity value.

4.2.1      Vision

The Redevelopment of the Old Barracks Heritage Centre is designed to attract significantly higher visitor numbers than that which is currently being achieved.  This will be achieved by providing an easily assimilated vision of the international dimensions of the life and work of Daniel O’Connell, as seen from the perspective of his town of birth.

The totally redeveloped visitor attraction will employ cost-effective, innovative information and communications technology solutions providing both local and worldwide access to the preservation and dissemination of the O’Connell legacy.  It will also provide an opportunity for networking between and across similar facilities.

Where possible, the construction of the facility will be undertaken in line with the principles of low carbon footprint and sustainability.

The marketing strategy for the celebration of the international influence of Daniel O’Connell at the Old Barracks Heritage Centre will reflect the unique and innovative concept.  It will focus on the following: -

r  Local and National Market – focussing on the community, and the education sector; and

r  International Market – through the development of new markets in cultural and educational materials.

Given the voluntary nature of ACARD, the management and operation of the proposed facility will be developed to create employment opportunity for the maximum possible number of local people, and particularly individuals who are presently long-term unemployed.

4.3      Business Plan: Market

4.3.1      Current Visitor Performance

The imperative to undertake the refurbishment of the Old Barracks Heritage Centre has been driven, in part, by the relatively low (and annually declining) number of visitors.  The following table is extracted from the Fáilte Ireland Visitor Attraction Performance Indicators (October 2012)[7].  The table places the Old Barracks visitor attraction performance against all others in Co. Kerry. 

In 2011 The Old Barracks Heritage Centre was ranked 18 out of 22 visitor attraction in Co. Kerry on the basis of its visitor performance.

Table 5 – Old Barracks Visitor Performance

Name of Attraction

2007

2008

2009

2010

2011

Aquadome

166,147

148,590

157,788

148,396

142,301

Muckross House

163,280

 

95,773

91,017

105,145

Dingle Oceanworld

108,000

94,748

97,497

84,110

103,696

Louis Mulcahy Workshop

 

67,000

55,000

60,500

62,500

Blasket Centre/Ionad an Bhlascaoid

46,356

41,413

38,627

42,896

41,717

Gallarus Castle and Oratory

 

 

 

44,004

41,024

The Skellig Experience

31,237

28,494

18,500

27,500

35,500

St Johns Arts Centre and Theatre

35,000

35,000

35,000

35,000

35,000

Siamsa Tire Theatre and Arts Centre

36,571

36,824

31,148

32,293

33,473

Ross Castle

30,769

28,401

22,619

30,354

25,509

Kerry County Museum

35,000

28,500

30,000

26,000

24,080

Derrynane House and Gardens

18,715

18,854

21,330

21,576

23,209

Geokaun Mountain & Fogher Cliffs

15,000

15,000

17,000

17,000

18,000

Skellig Michael

12,030

10,324

10,642

12,343

9,750

Ardfert Cathedral

5,701

6,239

4,315

4,552

5,009

Kells Bay Gardens

 

1,000

2,000

4,000

5,000

The Lartigue Monorailway

1,919

2,400

2,605

3,100

3,320

The Old Barracks

4,072

3,860

2,574

2,471

2,730

Scanlon’s Pet Farm

 

 

 

1,765

2,240

Listowel Castle

2,316

1,721

2,232

2,257

2,182

Músaem Chorca Dhuibhne

2,169

1,703

1,560

1,800

1,816

Kilgarvan Motor Museum

1,362

1,600

1,500

1,164

1,165

From the table above it can be seen that both the relative visitor number performance of the Old Barracks Heritage Centre is poor, and the year-on-year performance is poor.  The relative performance is graphically presented below, using the nearby ‘Skellig Experience’ and Derrynane House as visitor number comparators.

Figure 9 – Relative Performance 2007-2011

The figure above illustrates that the annual visitor performance of the Old Barracks has generally trended with that of the two comparative local attractions over the period, albeit that the visitor numbers have reduced by 1,342 (33%) between 2007 and 2011.

4.3.2      Current Revenue Generation

Table 6 – Current Entrance Fee Schedule

Entrance Fee 2012

Amount

Single Adult

€4.00

Unwaged and Student

€2.00

Family (2 Adults and 2 Children)

€9.00

Parties 10-20

€3.00

Parties >20

€2.00

Average (Estimate)

€3.50

Given the annual visitor performance, and assuming an average entrance fee of €3.50 per visitor, the current revenue generation capacity for the Old Barracks can be estimated as being €9,555 in 2011. 

This revenue is generated during the annual seasonal period of 15th March – 15th September.  Thus, the facility is operational 25 weeks per annum to generate its current income and is, therefore, achieving a weekly income of €382.

4.3.3      Current Market View

Some of the reason for the relatively weak visitor performance of the Heritage Centre can be gleaned from the view (July 2008) expressed on www.tripadvisor.ie: -

‘Pass up on this one, folks. The outside of the barracks (built ca1871) at Cahersiveen is a nice photo op, but to go inside will cost you at least 3-5 Euro, which is really not worth it unless you are extremely interested in the town hero, Daniel O' Connell. The "introductory video", which is shown essentially in the lounge of a bathroom, is basically home videos of town sports. The exhibits, which sprawl across the top 2 floors and without much organisation, are old and poorly done--many have that high school science fair project look.  They do provide some good, interesting information on the area during the famine, the region's growth and leaders, and especially O'Connell. On the whole the facility is kind of dirty, has terrible signage, a staff that is not very helpful or interested, and is a waste of time given all the other amazing sights and better museums on the Ring of Kerry.’

This view is countered, however, by one dated September 2012: -

‘Highly recommend this for the history, the view, and the ladies at the front desk, who were great!  Didn't dislike anything about it.’

To obtain an authoritative external evaluation of the current offering of the Heritage Centre, Martin McCarthy of CIT, was requested to visit the Old Barracks[8] and provide a commentary, summarised below.

‘The existing entrance has a lot of nice photographs of the Barracks up high on the wall or in places where visitors who’re looking at them might cause an obstruction or would be standing in the paths of other visitors. Artefacts, whether they be pictures, text, or objects, should be easily accessible to visitor, not just for the sake of the exhibit, but also for the general safety of visitors. If someone is straining to look up at photographs they may continue to walk forward to see the next one, not paying attention at the ground that they’re walking on; this could cause an accident. Seeing as most visitors who come to museums and interpretative centres come in pairs, they often view artefacts in pairs and like to point out features that they find interesting to each other (like parents following their enthusiastic children around). If artefacts are far away, this becomes much harder and even frustrating. There is also the possibility that people might miss the photographs altogether.

The paths that visitors follow in museums are important; if someone is blocking a path, this generally has an impact on most other visitors in the vicinity. In short, museums are home to a highly refined set of social activities. For instance; strangers don’t stand too close to each other, people glean information on the space and the opportunities it affords by watching the people around them interact with it, people are aware that they are sharing a public space, and many more activities besides. Blocking paths is something that should be avoided – chances are, visitors won’t want to do it anyway or will intuitively know and feel uncomfortable while doing it, so putting artefacts that will grab attention on path ways is not a good idea. In the existing entrance there were some photographs above door openings; this should be avoided in future.

The stairs are areas that should be shown particular attention. As it is, they’re dark with posters of text and pictures on the walls. I think that the stairs should serve primarily as gateways from one section of the Barracks to the next, and not as exhibit spaces. That is not to say that their walls should be totally blank; I think that some strategically placed content should be put there, enough to hold the interest of visitors and to pull them through to the next section, but not so much for them to linger there too long only to start blocking the paths of other visitors. Maybe this content could take the form of ambient audio that would have originated from the Barracks when it was originally built (guards dragging prisoners up stairs), or simple video projections (flames from when the Barracks was torched).

There are a number of recreated scenes in the Barracks; the prisoner’s cell, the RIC office, and the forge. (It may not actually have been a forge, it was on the first floor on in the corner, it looked like a type of workshop of some sorts.) Where as it is good to have original artefacts on display as visitors like, and possibly expect, to see some, I personally found the scenes to be a bit lifeless. It is quite possible that the majority of visitors wouldn’t even know what some of the artefacts do, especially younger visitors.

If new scenes are to be created for the upcoming exhibit, then they should be more open and engaging. In the case of the RIC office, there were numerous books on the table – what was in these books, regardless of whether or not they were original? Are there records of petty criminal activity or more serious era defining republican activity?

If people were allowed to look through the books, then this would add a deeper and more meaningful engagement for more serious visitors, whilst not boring less interested visitors who have desire to take their inquisitiveness any further.

Perhaps you might want to create a court scene (or even the British House of Commons) for the new exhibit, taking the same approach?  You could guess that younger visitors might be content with banging the judge’s gavel or reading about their attire, but older visitors might like to skim through court proceedings that Daniel O’Connell was involved in. This type of engagement would be much more authentic than reading about the same proceedings printed on a poster spanning and entire wall, which would disembody the history from its source of action.

I though that the prisoners cell on the first floor was very static, but that the idea of an ‘actual’ prisoners cell has potential.  As it was, little happened in there other than looking at a mannequin prisoner lying in a bed, in a room that didn’t look like an authentic prison cell from the last century. What if a short one-minute film was made of a prisoner in a cell, shot on location, in a more authentic prison cell? He could talk to the camera about why he is there, what the conditions were like, the RIC, and life in Cahersiveen at the time. This could then be played on a small screen that would fit inside the peephole on the door, and the room could be closed off. Even though the room is closed off and they never get a chance to look inside it, the film give visitors a more accurate representation of what the lives of prisoners were like back then, rather than what is on show there now.

The original plans of the building are an asset that shouldn’t go to waste.

The size and shape of the building attracts a lot of attention and raises many questions. Will these plans go on display if an exhibit on Enoch Trevor Owen and his work goes ahead? Would there be a possibility to create an educational game to complement such an exhibit, something that will teach younger visitors about architecture? Many people believe the story of the mix-up with the plans; is there an opportunity here to teach people about different architectural styles and periods?’

4.3.4      Market Expectation

The visitor attraction market is mature and well-developed in Ireland.  The Old Barracks Heritage Centre will have to compete in this market for its visitors.

Extracts from ‘Sharing our Stories - Using interpretation to improve the visitors’ experience at heritage sites’ (Fáilte Ireland)

Target consumers are looking for active involvement in a heritage experience.  They want to engage with a destination’s heritage through learning, interacting and doing, rather than simply observing it (Source: Fáilte Ireland Innovation Research, carried out by Genesis Marketing, 2007).

A satisfying experience can include linking heritage sites to contemporary life, participating in festivals or arts performances, visiting atmospheric towns and villages, visiting places associated with famous people or other aspects of contemporary culture (e.g. locations of movies), and eating local food.

Authenticity in heritage is very important to visitors who are looking for a genuine and distinctive experience. They particularly value aspects of a culture and heritage that are supported by the local population.

Accessing ‘real’ experiences, which are enjoyed by the locals and connect to the local area, is important in their overall satisfaction levels with their holiday. 

Well-planned interpretation creates the active, engaged and authentic interaction with heritage sites that these consumers want and expect. Our visitors need easy access, both physical and intellectual, to our culture and heritage and they need interpretation to make that visit worthwhile, meaningful and memorable.

Interpretation

Bringing the past to life so that it resonates with visitors, and gets them thinking and talking is the role of interpretation. It is a communication process that links factual information to the immediate, first hand experience of the place and to the contemporary lives of visitors. It sheds light on the present and gives meaning to the past. It links us to the stories of the generations who were here before us. These are the rewards that heritage sites can offer visitors, and interpretation delivers them.

Well-planned interpretation makes the experience of ‘being there’ richer and more relevant. It welcomes modern visitors into the rich heritage of your site and helps them appreciate its treasures. It engages visitors in activities and gives information that provokes their emotions, imagination and understanding. It sheds light on Irish culture, past and present, and provokes questions and dialogue.

The best interpretation is often a well-informed person who is steeped in understanding of the site and passionate about welcoming visitors into its story. Welcoming, well-informed, well-trained and responsive guides can give visitors that first hand contact with Irish people that so many find attractive.

Interpretation can use other media such as print (panels and leaflets in all their forms), audio, multimedia and others.

Interpreting heritage sites well will enhance visitor satisfaction levels and build memorable experiences of your site that they will want to talk about. Good interpretation translates into positive word of mouth referrals to other potential visitors, an invaluable asset to a tourism business.

Interpretation, particularly if carried out face-to-face, can be ‘the voice of the place’.  It can incorporate human-interest stories, local folklore, dialect and accent.

Heritage visitors want ‘authenticity’.

4.3.5      Size and Potential

Market Size

Fáilte Ireland records that paid attractions in Co. Kerry accounted for some 720,000 visitors in 2011.

Figure 10 – Paid Visitor Attraction Trend 2007-2011

The figure above identifies that the sectoral growth rate in Co. Kerry for paid visitor attractions for the period 2008-2011 was approximately 10% per annum.  By 2011 the sector had returned to position equalling the number of visitors achieved in the final ‘Celtic Tiger’ year of 2007.  However, it is noted that the origin mix of the visitors in 2011 had changed significantly from that of 2007, with reductions in both the North American and UK share, and an increase in domestic visitors.

Market Value Estimate

It is notoriously difficult to reliably estimate the value of the tourism industry to Co. Kerry.

q  Fáilte Ireland[9] records that at national level the expenditure by visitors to Ireland was estimated to be worth €3.16 billion in 2011.  There were 6.24 million overseas visitors in 2011.

q  Kerry County Council[10] notes that the county’s tourism industry is a significant economic and social force with 15% of the county’s workforce employed in this sector in 2006.  With the growth in affluence, mobility and leisure time, tourism is one of the major growth areas of the national economy.  A total of €1,233m was spent by 3.6 million visitors to the southwest region in 2006, having increased by an average of 10.6% per annum since 2001.

q  Killarney Visitor Survey 2010[11] provides some insight into the average spending pattern of a visitor to the town.  The survey was undertaken between November 2009 and October 2010, and some 659 respondents were surveyed.

Table 7 – Average Daily Spend (per Person)

Items of Expenditure

Most Frequent Spend

Average Spend

Bed and Breakfast

€35.00

€59.13

Room Only

€30.00

€35.12

Food

€30.00

€37.28

Drink

€20.00

€25.38

Shopping

€50.00

€51.01

Entertainment

€20.00

€22.86

Transport

€20.00

€24.34

Miscellaneous

€10.00

€22.42

Total Daily Spend

€100.00

€152.07

Given that Section 4.2 of this report has identified that some 2,471 visitors are recorded to have visited the Old Barracks Heritage Centre in 2010, the maximum likely local spend that would have accrued to Cahersiveen town and environs would be in the region of €93,941 over the course of that year.  (Estimated on the basis of 25% of total average daily spend).

Accepting the above assumption, it is possible to estimate that the current average €3.5 entrance fee to the Old Barracks Heritage Centre might be leveraging up to an additional €34.50 into the local economy, representing an approximate gearing ratio of 10.

Sectoral Potential

The Fáilte Ireland ‘Tourism Barometer’ September 2012 concludes that visitor attractions enjoyed a fairly positive year. Nearly half (46%) of visitor attractions increased their visitor numbers compared to the previous year, and about a fifth (19%) had achieved the same level.  The Barometer identifies ‘Irish people holidaying in Ireland’ as a key reason for success in the sector compared to most other sectors, with over half (53%) of attractions stating this as a positive factor.

Fáilte Ireland has identified a number of trends in the profile of those engaging in activity holidays, including: -

1.    Aging Baby-Boomers - The older generation (over 50s) is living longer and is healthier and more active than their predecessors.  They will generate increased demand for holidays in the coming years, taking more short breaks, and are more amenable to taking holidays outside of the peak season, whether due to having no domestic obligations or due to retirement.

2.    Generations X and Y (18-44 years) - Generations X and Y tend to be well-travelled and internet savvy and they fall into two distinct groups: -

a.    High disposable income/time poor – this group tries to fits as much as possible into their holiday, they are seeking once in a lifetime experiences and are likely to use a tour operator. Social media is important to them.

b.    Smaller budget/time rich – this group have more time and may be on “gap” years (becoming popular not just among school/university leavers). They are seeking engagement with locals and their culture in order to have authentic experiences. Given their abundance of time and smaller budgets, value/budget is a key selling point and trekking and backpacking are popular.  Environmental matters are a key value among this group and so sustainability/responsible tourism are important to them.

3.    Changing Families - The nuclear family (parents and children) is becoming smaller both in terms of numbers of children and an increase in single parent families. To compensate, families are forming into a more vertical structure, with grandparents, aunts, uncles and cousins becoming more important into the lifestyle of the family.

4.    Patchwork Families - Families comprise of parents who have children from previous relationships (who may or may not live with them full-time), in addition to their ‘shared’ children, and by extension a multiplicity of grandparents, aunts/uncles and cousins.  Furthermore, the age group of the children of such ‘patchwork’ families may be quite broad from the very young to adults with children of their own.

There are several implications arising from the above developments as these families seek to share their leisure time. For many, activity holidays are the platform for families to bond and generate shared memories and experiences. Parents wish to experience and share a renewed sense of adventure with their children and to provide them with a sense of freedom that children from urban areas, in particular, do not get to experience on a day-to-day basis.

Single Households/Women Travelling Alone - People are marrying later and this means that people are living on their own for longer. As a result there will be an increase in people travelling alone in the coming years. In addition, there has been a steady increase in the number of women travelling either alone or in groups. These two segments have very similar needs. They seek above all to travel in a safe and secure way but they also wish to use their holidays as an opportunity to socialise, either with friends or to make new friends. Activity holidays provide an opportunity to engage with a group through an activity. Singletons seek out smaller groups that afford an opportunity to mix socially and make new friends. In addition, women travellers look for a high standard of good attentive service. 

Projection 2013 and Beyond

Fáilte Ireland’s targets for 2013 projects 7.6 million visitors, representing a growth in visitor numbers of + 5% over 2012.   This performance will be driven by an increase in visitors from North American and Mainland Europe.  In the short-term, much is being made of the potential for the Gathering Ireland to deliver significant sectoral regeneration.

Assuming that a linear trickle-down of tourism numbers will occur at local level, it is possible to project that similar growth rates will be achieved by the Old Barracks Heritage Centre.  However, the refurbishment of the Centre will be accompanied by the opportunity to attract a range of new and additional visitor sectors, and accompanying activities.

Figure 11 – Base Visitor Number Projection 2013+


Table 8 – Base Revenue Generation Projection 2013+

 

2007

2008

2009

2010

2011

2012

2013

2014

2015

Revenue

€14,252

€13,510

€9,009

€8,649

€9,555

€10,511[12]

€11,036

€11,585

€12,163

 

Innovative Potential 

From the perspective of Fáilte Ireland, Traditional Culture comprises of the following product offerings, all of which are relevant to the facilities that can be accommodated at the Old Barracks Heritage Centre: -

r  Traditional music.

r  Traditional song.

r  Traditional dance.

r  Traditional storytelling,

r  The Irish language.

r  Traditional crafts and customs.

 

Contemporary Culture, and the Living Arts embrace the world of the arts at its intersection with the tourism product.  In the context of the Old Barracks Heritage Centre, the potential points of contact include the following: -

r  Visual arts/design

r  Crafts tourism

r  Performing arts (e.g. modern dance, theatre, opera)

r  Music, classical and contemporary

r  Film tourism

r  Literary tourism

 

The exhibition space to be created by the refurbishment would allow for the provision Training Space, and this same facility might also be used to build upon the establishment of the Old Barracks Heritage Centre as a venue for appropriate, small-scale festivals and events.

 

Fáilte Ireland estimated that in 2009 attendances at festivals/events by overseas visitors were 376,000.   The Events and Activities market can be segmented in many ways, although the Old Barracks Heritage Centre is constrained in what it might offer due to the lack of supporting on-site infrastructure, and the relatively small scale of the House itself.

 

The emerging demand for Civil Ceremonies[13] may present an opportunity for a reconfigured use of the exhibition spaces and the yard area of the Old Barracks Heritage Centre.

 

Whilst not directly related to the potential tourism experiences that the Old Barracks Heritage Centre has to offer, Natural Heritage refers the geological and ecological systems that create the distinctive local landscape.  Tangential potential references can be found, however, both in the development of local tourism opportunities spreading out from Old Barracks Heritage Centre, and in the servicing of other attractions that focus on this dimension.

‘Soft’ Adventure Holidays incorporate a range of activities, some of which are particularly relevant to the development potential of the Old Barracks Heritage Centre.  These include eco tourism, yoga, and short trekking.  It is noted that activities in these categories are known to appeal particularly to women. The UK Mintel Report[14] noted that ‘one of the fastest-growing sectors of the (leisure holiday) market – soft adventure travel – has a clear appeal to women - particularly solo female travellers. In general, activity holidays containing strong components of relaxation and comfort resonate most with women’.  The report continues: ‘Those who have tried activity holidays are most likely to be aged between 20 and 44, led by the pre-family then the family lifestage segments. Family adventure holidays are seeing fast growth’.

Generally speaking, despite the fall off in global tourism, the adventure travel sector was less affected by the downturn in global tourism than mainstream tourism[15].  This is also reflected in trends for ‘sports’ holidays in Europe as estimated by the European Travel Monitor, where the potential for such holidays has grown steadily since 2005.

Fáilte Ireland reported in 2009 that ‘overseas visitors account for just over one third of all participants in activities.  Mainland Europe is the largest overseas market followed by Britain, while North America and the other long haul markets account for less than 10% of participants’.

The activity tourism market in Ireland was worth €1.1 billion in 2009, €653 million from overseas visitors and €404 million from the domestic market.  Overseas visitors who engaged in activity tourism are a high yield segment and spend 33% more than the average visitor.

 

It is proposed that during the course of the period 2013-2015 and beyond, ACARD will explore all of the above options for creating additional revenue streams that are sympathetic to the thrust of the Old Barracks Heritage Centre.  Given the number and nature of such potential streams outlined above, it is proposed that a target of 50% additional revenue generation per annum will be targeted over period from the development of a mix of these potential sources.  It is noted that many of these potential generators will help to break the reliance of the facility on seasonality.

Table 9 – Total Revenue Generation Targets 2013-2015

 

2013

2014

2015

Revenue